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Citrus and Wattleseed Hot Cross Buns

We love cooking little home baked goodies for our clients to enjoy on our eco tours or hikes. It's not too often we go home with anything left in the containers as they are usually devoured in minutes of serving.

Most of you know that we have a great bond and deep respect for the traditional owners of this land, and this is just one way we know how to honor Aboriginal culture.

It is our hope that by introducing you to the foods of the bush that you will begin your journey of self discovery into the world of Bushtucker and learn from those whose bond with the earth is second to none.

Our spices and herbs are only sourced through Aboriginal business's around Australia and we encourage you to get on board and support these amazing suppliers.

Outback Chef, Outback Pride, Warndu, The Australian Super Food Co

Citrus and Wattleseed Hot Cross Buns

Ingrediants:

3 cups Almond Meal

Pinch Sea Salt

1/2 tsp Bicarb Soda

1/4 cup Olive Oil (can also use Macadamia or Almond Oil)

75g sultanas

50 g Lemon & Lime Zest

1 tsp ground Wattleseed

1 Apple, peeled, cored grated

2 Eggs

1 tsp Cinnamon

50g chocolate 70% Cocoa (+ bag for piping)

Method:

Step 1 - Preheat oven to 160 degrees

Step 2 - Combine all ingredients (except chocolate) into a bowl and mix well

Step 3 - Divide into 12 even portions and place on a baking tray

 Step 4 - Bake 25 minutes or until golden

Step 5 - Remove and cool

Step 6 - Melt chocolate, pour into piping bag and drizzle crosses on top. Place in fridge until chocolate sets.

Wattleseeds are the edible seeds from any of 120 species of Australian Acacia that were traditionally used as food by Aboriginal Australians, and eaten either green or dried to make a type of bush bread.

Acacia seed flour has recently gained popularity in Australia due to its high nutritional content, hardiness, and low toxicity. Due to its low glycemic index, it is suitable for incorporation into diabetic foods. It is used due to its chocolate, coffee, hazelnut flavour profile. It is added to ice cream, granola, chocolate, bread, and used by chefs to enhance sauces and dairy desserts.